Gateway to International Education

Sweden

Sweden:

The capital of Sweden, Stockholm, is also the country’s largest city, with more than 930,000 inhabitants. Other large cities are Gothenburg, in western Sweden (population 550,000), and Malmö (population 300,000) in the south. Uppsala and Lund are well-known university cities.Less than three per cent of Sweden’s land area is built up and forests cover 69 per cent of the country. Sweden is long – some 1,574 kilometers from top to bottom – and can be divided into three major regions: Götaland in the south, Svealand in the middle and Norrland in the north. There are 10 million people in Sweden, of whom about 2 million are under the age of 18. Eighty-five percent of them live in cities. Sweden is a very multicultural country: 15 per cent of Swedes were born in another country, while about one in five children in Sweden has a family with roots in another country. wedish is the official language of Sweden. The vast majority of Swedes also speak English, and generally to a very high level. Many Swedish multinational organisations have English as their corporate language, and a large number of university degree programmes and courses are taught in English. Sweden is home to five official national minority languages, and countless other languages are spoken by Sweden’s diverse population. The largest, after Swedish, are Finnish, Serbo-Croatian, Arabic, Kurdish, Spanish, German and Farsi (source, in Swedish). Sweden is a parliamentary democracy. The main political parties are grouped into two blocs: a left-of-centre bloc consisting of the Social Democrats, the Left Party and the Green Party; and the centre-right bloc consisting of the Moderate Party, the Centre Party, the Christian Democrats and the Liberal Party.Sweden’s parliament is called the Riksdag, to which members are elected every four years.The Swedish head of state since 1973 has been King Carl XVI Gustaf. He has no political power, but represents the country and performs ceremonial dutie.Swedes study and work hard but they also take their rest and relaxation seriously. So the fika – a coffee break that normally consists of coffee or tea, cookies or sweet buns, but can also include soft drinks, fruit and sandwiches – is a social institution and an important part of the national culture. You can fika (it’s a verb as well as a noun) with your family or on your first date. nnovation

By any measure, Sweden is one of the world’s most innovative nations, and it has been called the most digitally connected economy. Swedes are early adopters of new technology and the country’s non-hierarchical society creates a fertile environment for new ideas. The Swedish government invests a higher proportion of GDP in R&D than most other nations. Generations of innovativeness have led to a long list of world-changing inventions like the three-point seatbelt, the pacemaker, the adjustable wrench and safety matches. More recent Swedish inventions include Spotify and Skype

1. Creativity is central

When you study in Sweden, you’re encouraged to think independently, creatively and critically. You’ll develop your ability to question the status quo by assessing information, seeking new perspectives and coming up with well-informed opinions. You’ll be free to think creatively because of the informal and non-hierarchical nature of Swedish society, where everyone is encouraged to contribute ideas and opinions.

This independence of mind and the fact that everyone can make their voice heard are two of the reasons why Sweden ranks among the world’s most innovative nations. Another is that investment in research is among the highest in the world in relation to GDP.

Sweden’s status as a leader in innovation and a home of trendsetters and early adopters is nothing new: the list of Swedish world-changing inventions is a long one and includes the seatbelt, the pacemaker and the music service Spotify. Which one of your brilliant ideas will Sweden help make reality?

2. Coursework is challenging – in a good way

Sweden has a long and proud history of academic excellence and despite its relatively small population, it’s home to some of the world’s best universities. The entire Swedish higher education system is ranked as one of the best in the world, and several Swedish universities are ranked by the Times Higher Education and the Academic Ranking of World Universities as being among the world’s best.

In Sweden you’ll find a strong focus on rationality, reason and applying knowledge so that it makes a real difference. Look no further than the Nobel Prize, the world’s most prestigious academic distinction, for an illustration of the Swedish approach.

As a student here you’ll become part of this tradition of academic excellence. Just don’t expect to passively receive information: you’ll be encouraged and challenged to contribute, speak your mind and take your education into your own hands.

Swedish universities are well-adapted to the needs of international students, and Sweden consistently ranks in the top three in the world for English proficiency. You’ll be able to use English with everyone you meet, from the classroom to city the centre.

3. Sustainability and the environment are in focus

If you’re concerned with sustainable development for a greener future, you’ll feel right at home in Sweden. Environmental issues are high priority here, and Sweden has been named the most sustainable country in the world for its use of renewable energy (it has the highest percentage of renewable energy in the EU).

Swedish society is known for its inclusiveness and equality – you may have heard Sweden referred to as the most equal country in the world. It consistently places among the world’s top countries in gender equality, while lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) rights in Sweden are regarded as among the most progressive in the world.

The belief that everyone is of equal value contributes to Sweden’s consensus approach to getting things done, where everyone takes part in the decision-making process. During your studies, you’ll learn how to balance different interests, needs and ideas to bring out the best in everyone and solve complex issues as a team – vital skills for your global career, where teamwork across cultures is the norm.

 You’ll learn skills for a global career

What’s the most important thing you’ll need for success in your career? According to a global study of CEOs, it’s creativity. And creativity is exactly what studying in Sweden will foster, along with other in-demand skills such as how to combine theory and practice, and how to navigate complex situations where there’s no easy solution.

Many degree programmes in Sweden include internships, which are a great way to get real-world experience while you build your professional network. If you’re interested in research, doing a master’s in Sweden can be a great way to make the contacts you’ll need to carry on and do a PhD.The fact that Sweden is home to the largest number of multinationals per capita of any country in the world and is the birthplace of many world-conquering companies – including IKEA, TetraPak, Volvo, Ericsson, AstraZeneca and H&M – means that getting on the career ladder here can really take you places. Should you receive a job offer while you’re still studying here, you can apply for a work permit and enjoy the work-life balance that Sweden is famous for.

Bonus: life is international student-friendly

So Sweden is green, creative, equal and open. What else should you know before you decide to study here?Everyone speaks English – Sweden regularly ranks as one of the top countries in the world for non-native speakers of English. That means you don’t have to speak any Swedish to study here.Public transport is widespread, and it works. Sweden’s extensive network of buses, trains, subways, trams, boats, planes and more can take you anywhere you want to go, car-free.International students can work in Sweden. Though your studies are your number-one priority, there’s no legal limit to the amount of hours international  students can work during their studies. After completing your studies, you can apply to extend your residence permit to look for work for up to six months. (If you do want to work, learning Swedish is important – it’s often a requirement for jobs).Sweden is clean and safe, and the standard of living is high.

WHY STUDY IN SWEDEN

Bachelor / Master Programes Available

  • Maximum no of Universities are Govt.
  • Programs Available in Feb & August Intake
  • Currently, some 30,000 foreign students are studying in Sweden
  • Part Time work allowed for students - 20 Hrs / Week
  • International Students are allowed to stay back for Job search Visa
  • Sweden has three universities in top 100 and eleven in top 500 of the 2010 edition of the Academic Ranking of World Universities compiled by Shanghai Jiao Tong University
  • Strong links to research; Sweden is one of the world's most committed investors in basic research.
  • Sixty percent of university students are women.
  • Many students studying in Sweden come from abroad – approximately 20% of new students – making Sweden one of the world’s most inclusive countries for education.
  • Sweden has a number of large multinational corporations, such as telecom provider Ericsson, automotive companies Volvo and Scania, household appliances corporation Electrolux, bearing manufacturer SKF, and high-tech engineering groups Sandvik and Atlas Copco.
  • Sweden has a long and proud history of academic excellence, with outstanding universities dating back to the 15th century. Sweden is the home of the Nobel Prize, the world's most prestigious academic distinction.
  • Swedish universities offer around 600 masters programs in English, ranging from human rights law to mechanical engineering.
  • Many students studying in Sweden come from abroad, making Sweden one of the world’s most exclusive countries for education.
  • English is spoken by all, Many Swedish companies use English as their official working language.
  • High Visa Success for Genuine Students

It is a big step to study abroad, and the options are almost limitless. So what makes Sweden stand out as a study destination?

Innovation and creativity run deep Sweden is a safe and modern country in northern Europe, and it has accrued a spectacular reputation as an innovator and creative force. Sweden’s famed corporate brands — like Volvo, IKEA, Ericsson, H&M and Saab — complement its cultural brands — like Ingmar Bergman, Abba, Astrid Lindgren, Bjorn Borg, August Strindberg, The Cardigans and Greta Garbo.

Standards are high
Sweden has a long and proud history of academic excellence, with outstanding universities dating back to the 15th century. Sweden is the home of the Nobel Prize, the world’s most prestigious academic distinction. Today, Sweden’s reputation for innovation is built on close cooperation between industry and academia. Swedish universities are renowned for their investigative research and independent thinking, and this reputation is cemented with rigorous quality control and nationally certified degrees. Sweden has one of the most ambitious educational evaluation programs in Europe, aimed at maintaining this competitive edge.

Choice
Swedish universities offer around 600 master’s degree programs in English, ranging from human rights law to mechanical engineering. Programs are structured in response to student demand — the result is a student-centric education system, with open, informal relations between students and teachers, and where personal initiative and critical thought are prized.

Foreign students are welcome
Many students studying in Sweden come from abroad — 8.5% of the student body, according to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) — making Sweden one of the world’s most inclusive countries for education. But there is room for more: the number grew by over 80% over the last 4-year period. There are now PhD candidates from some 80 countries working towards their degrees in Sweden. Sweden’s educational policy is based on the recognition that a multicultural student body is a resource. Competition for places is keen, but students of all nationalities may apply, given the right credentials; and degree equivalency for past studies is granted on a flexible basis.

Scholarships are available
The Swedish Institute grants hundreds of scholarships every year to help foreign students make their stay in Sweden more affordable. Currently, tuition fees for everyone are fully subsidized by the state. Sweden’s public spending on education is the OECD’s highest, at 4.9% of GDP. And because it costs to live in Sweden, foreign students can work while studying.

English is spoken by all
Almost all Swedes speak fluent English. Many Swedish companies use English as their official working language. Foreign students find that this prevalence of English makes adapting to their new surroundings much easier.

Accommodation 
For many people, studying abroad will be their first experience of living away from home for a longer period. This can be a daunting prospect for anyone, especially in view of the demands associated with being a full-time student while trying to gain a foothold in a new culture. It is therefore important that your living environment is comfortable and affordable; you should give yourself plenty of time to make all the necessary arrangements before leaving for Sweden.

Exchange students
If you are an exchange student in the Socrates/Erasmus programs you will receive assistance with accommodation arrangements from the host academic institution. Be sure to confirm this with your contact person before you leave for Sweden.

Free movers
If you are a free mover, i.e. a person applying on an individual basis, or if you need to arrange your own accommodation for any other reason, you should keep a few things in mind: There is no national system which handles requests for student accommodation. The local student union at your university fulfils this function, though it is not required to guarantee you accommodation, and may not in fact be able to help you.

The availability of accommodation varies considerably from place to place. Usually, there is plenty of accommodation available at schools located in smaller and middle-sized cities or towns. Unfortunately, the situation is more difficult in the larger cities, especially in Stockholm and Goteborg, and in the traditional student cities of Lund and Uppsala. Often, the number of students exceeds the number of rooms that universities and university colleges have on offer and waiting times are long. However, there are alternatives.

In addition to contacting your student union, you can also try contacting student housing providers directly. Associations and companies that provide student housing have set up a website for locating local housing providers.
If you are a student or guest researcher at Stockholm University, Karolinska Institute, KTH (the Royal Institute of Technology) or Stockholm School of Economics, The University Accommodation Centre offers furnished apartments and rooms.

To sign a lease for student accommodation, you must be able to prove that you are already studying or that you have been admitted to an academic institution. When you want to move out you must give at least one month's written notice. Other rules may also apply.
You can rent a flat in the private market. Though usually more expensive, it is a viable option for some students. It is not uncommon for students to share a bigger flat with several rooms. You may also be able to rent a single room privately. Other sources of information are local newspapers and message boards at your university.

Whether provided by student unions or by third parties, accommodation catering expressly for students is often the preferred option, however. Student flats or rooms tend to be less expensive than private alternatives; they give you a chance to meet fellow students and participate in social activities, and they are often close to lecture halls, libraries and other facilities.
Depending on availability, you can choose to live by yourself or in a shared student flat where you will have your own room but share a bathroom/toilet. Flats can be furnished or unfurnished.

Student dormitories
Many students prefer to live in a student dormitory. This can be an enjoyable experience as it gives students from around the world an opportunity to get to know each other and make friends.

But it can also be demanding. Students living in the same corridor may have very different cultural backgrounds, different habits and ideas about how to do things. Most dormitories have 10-15 single rooms in each corridor. A kitchen is shared by 4-15 students. Female and male students live in the same corridor. Often there is also a communal television room.
A single room must not be occupied by more than one person – a rule which is strictly enforced. Students are responsible for cleaning their own rooms and the communal kitchen. Although rooms are let with basic furniture, there are no blankets, pillows, sheets, towels or light bulbs.

Some utensils may be available in the communal kitchen but you will usually have to bring your own plates, cutlery, pots and pans, etc. Some student unions rent these. Most student housing areas have launderettes. There is a booking list and a small fee is payable for the use of a washing machine. Rent for accommodation must be paid in advance.

.For universities located in cities, accommodation prices range from SEK 2,500 to SEK 4,500 for a room. To find out the precise availability and prices for student accommodation, contact the student union at your university or University College.

A few tips regarding accommodation
The situation with regard to accommodation for students is problematic in many parts of the country, sometimes very much so. There are simply not enough rooms and flats to go round. Fortunately, there are still towns and cities where conditions are better and where all or most students do get accommodation in time.

If you are not guaranteed accommodation as part of your exchange program or through some other agreement, it is vital that you approach your local student union as soon as possible. Remember that the situation will vary according to where you choose to study. Some universities or university colleges have more rooms than others. At some schools, the student union will guarantee you accommodation if you apply in time; others have special queues for newly arrived students. A good tip is to check for special offers for foreign students with the international desk at your educational institute.

Documents to be submitted in duplicate:

Application forms duly completed and signed (Form No. 105031).

Two photographs according to the instructions.

Valid passport along with two photocopies (of pages 1, 2 and last).

Admission letter from university/college. Study should be fulltime.

Fee confirmation receipt from college / University

Photocopy of all educational documents.

One must be able to show a minimum of SEK 7300 per month for 10 months in a year. Applicant is requested to show proof of financial support for the entire planned study period. Documentation certifying one's own bank assets (in the form of bank certificate and statement of accounts for the last six months) or documents certifying that one has received a scholarship or in some other similar manner must be provided, (if course is longer than needs to show for every year).

Accommodation must be arranged for in Sweden,

A comprehensive health insurance is required.

Any Date of birth proof is required i.e. 10 certificate or any other birth proof.Application fee INR 7,000 to be paid by demand draft favoring Embassy of Sweden (Visa), New Delhi.

The application is forwarded to the Swedish Migration Board in Sweden for decision.

Other Information:

Processing time-: 3 months

2 sets of photocopy of documents are required but visa form should be in original in both the sets. And along with this all documents in originals need to shown.

Balance certificate is required & bank statement should of last 6 months & only in the name of student itself, nobody can sponsor.

Applications for residence permit can be submitted to the Embassy of Sweden in New Delhi on Monday, Thursday & Friday from 9AM to 11AM, & on Tuesday from 2PM to 4PM.

No prior appointment is required.

Student has to appear personally for file submission.

Spouse, children’s can also apply.

 

Embassy ofSweden in New Delhi  

Nyaya Marg Chanakyapuri  
110021 New Delhi India  
Phone: +91-11-24197100  
Fax:     +91-11-26885401  
Fax visa Section:+91-11-24100834  
Email: ambassaden.new-delhi@foreign.ministry.se  
Emai visa Sectionl: ambassaden.new-delhi-visum@foreign.ministry.sepage  
Website: http://www.swedenabroad.com/Start____21488.aspx

https://studyinsweden.se/universities/

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